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- Comparisets
Beginning Microscopy Compariset
Build students' fundamental compound microscopy skills using this beautiful slide set. Includes five of the most common introductory slides: newsprint letter “e,” colored threads, natural fibers, three hair types, and salt crystals. See i...
Examine the similarities and differences among the major groups of protists. The five slides selected include Euglena, a mastigophoran (flagellate); Amoeba proteus, a sarcodine; Stentor, a ciliate; Plasmodium, a parasitic sporozoan; and mixed freshwa...
Prokaryotes vs. Eukaryotes - Compariset
At the cellular level, living things can be divided into two basic groups: the prokaryotes-without a distinct nucleus and membrane-bound organelles, and the eukaryotes-cells which do possess a distinct nucleus and membrane bound organelles. In this s...
Plant vs. Animal - Compariset
What comparison in biology is more fundamental than that between plants and animals? The slides in this set can be used to take this comparison to a different level-microscopic. Epidermal cells from onion leaf are compared and contrasted with those f...
Green Algae-Compariset
Are they protists, plants, or a little of both? Draw your own conclusions after examining these five slides. Chlamydomonas and Volvox are flagellated protists often grouped with the green algae due to similarities in pigmentation and structure. Uloth...
Sexual vs. Asexual-Compariset
The myriad solutions to the reproduction puzzle fall neatly into two divisions-sexual and asexual. Both have their advantages and disadvantages. This five-slide set will help to illuminate the basic differences and provide visual examples for each. A...
Roots & Stems-Compariset
Compare the root and stem structures of a representative monocot (Zea mays, corn) and a representative dicot (Ranunculus acris, the buttercup). Root and stem cross sections of each plant comprise the four slides included. Students can closely examine...
Monocot vs. Dicot - Compariset
Four composite slides selected to vividly illustrate the fundamental differences between those two sub-groups of the flowering plants. Cross sections of stems, roots, leaves, and flower buds contrast vascular tissue-arranged in a ring in dicots and s...
Plant Adaptations-Compariset
Plants have evolved to exist in an amazing diversity of habitats-all of which present unique demands. This selection of four slides focuses on plant structures adapted to extremes of moisture. Structures are from xerophytic (low moisture) and hydroph...
Body Architecture - Compariset
Acoelomates, pseudocoelomates, eucoelomates, ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm. In a course surveying the various invertebrate phyla, these words are often used when comparisons are made. This set includes four slides selected to substantiate those com...
A morbidly fascinating springboard to some very basic ideas about evolution, parasitism can be a marvelous teaching tool. A few of the mechanisms by which some organisms have evolved to make their living at others' expense are presented here. Plasmod...
Mitosis vs. Meiosis - Compariset
This set of four slides is selected to introduce and compare and contrast processes which are integral to any study of biology-to say the least! Mitosis-cellular division that results in two identical daughter cells; and meiosis-reduction division, t...
Tissue Types-Compariset
Students from general biology to advanced anatomy and physiology should be familiar with the major types of mammalian tissue. This four-slide set is an excellent way to illustrate that form follows function all the way down to the cellular level. The...
Muscle, Bone & Cartilage- Compariset
Enhance your students' understanding of the structure and function of the skeletal and muscular systems. Discuss the numerous vital functions performed by these systems-in addition to their providing the framework for movement and posture. Included a...
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