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Index Results
(8 Results)

AP1766 - $52.55
Break the carbohydrate code in this engaging “mystery lab.” Students learn about the structure and properties of carbohydrates and apply their knowledge to identify unknowns. The identities of five carbohydrates—starch, glucose, fructose, lactose and...
AP1769 - $72.40
The numbers are staggering! Starting with only about 20 different naturally occurring amino acids, a single cell may synthesize more than 3,000 different types of proteins. How do amino acids link together to build a protein? What role do amino acids...
AP8635 - $58.95
Proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins—your students have surely heard these words, and may have an understanding of what they are, but this Flinn-developed lab activity will allow students to relate these terms to the foods they eat every day. Using...
AP6503 - $61.05
Teach chemical test procedures for common foods—Vitamin C, starches, reducing sugars, fats and proteins—in the context of a murder mystery! Students start by performing the chemical tests to establish the “standards” for positive identification, so...
AP7334 - $29.25
Bananas are a good source of potassium—but do they also contain sodium? This flame test demonstration provides a safe, unique method for observing flame test colors of metal ions—no flammable solvents required! Demonstrate the characteristic colors...
AP7405 - $78.10
Are any other acids found in fruit juices besides citric acid? Some edible fruits contain six or more carboxylic acids, including benzoic and traces of oxalic. How are these acids separated and identified? Thin layer chromatography, or TLC, is a quick...
AP7428 - $46.45
Food dyes are everywhere, from food to drink to cosmetics! How much food dye is actually contained in products? In this experiment, determine how much or little of a series of food dyes are added to granular drink mixes to give these drinks their vivid...
AP7435 - $42.55
H. J. H. Fenton, an English chemist, discovered in 1894 that some metal ions, particularly the iron(II) ion, catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to generate highly reactive intermediates. Fenton’s reaction has been “rediscovered” and is...
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