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The Common Ion Effect Chemical Equilibrium Demonstration Kit encourages students to observe a series of changes when ions are added to solutions at equilibrium. The results illustrate the nature of equilibrium and Le Chateliers principle.

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In this set of demonstrations, students observe a series of dramatic changes when common ions are added to solutions at equilibrium. The results illustrate the nature of equilibrium and Le Chateliers principle.
  • Adding strong and weak acid solutions to cylinders containing a white powder causes the cylinders to overflow with colorful foam.
  • Blowing bubbles into a blue solution changes the color of the solution to yellow. Stirring in a white powder causes the solution to revert back to blue. Blowing again into the solution returns the original yellow. • Adding a clear liquid to a yellow solution produces an orange mixture. Stir in a white powder and the yellow reappears. Repeating the procedure sets up a color oscillation.

Includes Teacher Demonstration Notes and enough materials to perform each demonstration seven times.

Concepts: Common ion effect, equilibrium, Le Chateliers principle.
Time Required: 20 minutes
Chemicals Provided: Hydrochloric acid, acetic acid, sodium acetate, sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, sodium carbonate, ammonium hydroxide, ammonium chloride, phenolphthalein solution, bromthymol blue solution, alizarin yellow R solution.


Correlation to Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

Science & Engineering Practices

Analyzing and interpreting data
Constructing explanations and designing solutions

Disciplinary Core Ideas

MS-PS1.B: Chemical Reactions
HS-PS1.B: Chemical Reactions

Crosscutting Concepts

Patterns
Stability and change

Performance Expectations

HS-PS1-6. Refine the design of a chemical system by specifying a change in conditions that would produce increased amounts of products at equilibrium.