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Radioactive Decay Cards—Super Value Game

By: Purkis, Sumprer, Distante and Adler; Tappan Zee High School, Orangeburg, NY

Item #: AP4555

Price: $18.80

In Stock.

With the Radioactive Decay Card Game for Chemistry and Physics, students determine the natural decay of uranium-238 to lead-206 by arranging element cards and beta and alpha particle cards to create the uranium-238 decay series.

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Product Details

Nuclear stability and radioactive decay are important concepts for understanding nuclear chemistry, the size of the nucleus and the energy that holds it together. In this engaging activity, students determine the natural decay of uranium-238 to lead-206 by arranging element cards and beta and alpha particle cards to create the uranium-238 decay series. Detailed Teacher Notes and Radioactive Decay Series Cards are provided.

Super Value Game is complete for six student groups. All materials are reusable.

Specifications

Materials Included in Kit: 
Radioactive decay cards, 6


Correlation to Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

Science & Engineering Practices

Asking questions and defining problems
Developing and using models
Analyzing and interpreting data
Using mathematics and computational thinking

Disciplinary Core Ideas

MS-PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter
MS-PS3.B: Conservation of Energy and Energy Transfer
HS-PS1.C: Nuclear Processes
HS-PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter
HS-PS2.B: Types of Interactions
HS-ETS1.C: Optimizing the Design Solution

Crosscutting Concepts

Patterns
Systems and system models
Energy and matter
Stability and change

Performance Expectations

HS-PS1-8. Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during the processes of fission, fusion, and radioactive decay.
HS-PS4-3. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning behind the idea that electromagnetic radiation can be described either by a wave model or a particle model, and that for some situations one model is more useful than the other.
MS-PS1-1. Develop models to describe the atomic composition of simple molecules and extended structures.